BSPH in Community Health

Improving the health of our communities

Do you want to work with groups of people to improve their health and the health of their communities? A Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) in Community Health will train you do this and prepare you to enter the public health or healthcare workforce.

Many groups of people face significant challenges to living healthy lives. These challenges are influenced not only by individual choices but also by where we live, work and play. Through the BSPH in Community Health, students gain knowledge, skills and hands-on experience that prepares them to tackle these real world problems.

It is an exciting time to be part of the Social and Behavioral Sciences department at the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health. Join us and be part of our efforts to address the social determinants of health and advocate for better health, while also advancing research to understand and solve emerging issues.

Description of the video:

[words appear on screen: IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Fort Wayne]

[Different people appear and speak; between speakers, there are scenes of students and instructors on campus engaged in social and classroom activities]

 

[voice speaks]

Many groups of people face significant challenges to living healthy lives. And these challenges are influenced by not only individual choices, but also by where we live, work, and play.

Community health majors are uniquely positioned to tackle these challenges. Through this major, students gain knowledge, skills, and hands-on experience that prepares them to tack these real-world problems.

 

[words appear: Dr. Lisa Staten, Social and Behavioral Sciences Department Chair]

 

Our majors are improving community health in schools, worksites, health departments, nonprofit agencies, hospitals, and coalitions throughout Indiana and the world.

 

[voice changes, words appear: Elizabeth Moore, BSPH ’15, Practice Manager (MARK IS CURVED WRONG WAY ON VIDEO)]

 

I have always been interested in health, but not necessarily the clinical side of health. I instantly fell in love with the idea of working with the community and not just on an individual basis. I’m not just focused on why one person is ill, I want to know why everyone in that area is ill.

 

[voice changes; words appear: Tyler Andres, Student]

This information in this field is going to help me improve the population as a whole, not just, you know as a physician seeing a couple thousand people. I can affect millions of people’s lives now.

[voice changes; words appear: Mark Diauto, Student] We are learning the theory, but then we are actually applying the theory. And getting that early on is something that really gives students at Fairbanks an edge.

[voice changes; words appear: Elizabeth Moore, BSPH ’15, Practice Manager]

The classes were really relevant to real-life work. I didn’t go into the job having no clue what to expect. I felt like the classes really prepared me, the instructors prepared us—not just with the knowledge that we learned in Public Health, but also professionally.

[voice changes; words appear: Leah Jansen, Academic Advisor]

One of the things our students often report back to me, is how much real-world experience our faculty members can provide in the classroom. They are people that are actually in the field, doing the work, able to provide current application of what they are learning to practice.

[voice changes; words appear: Tyler Andres, Student]

Faculty members here are super passionate, super open to talking with students. And just hearing all the different opportunities that are available, in this city, just right here at your fingertips—I just feel like you can have all this opportunity here.

[voice changes; words appear: Dan Weddle, Student]

A lot of classes will try and get you out in the community, so they will involve service-learning hours.

[voice changes; words appear: Elizabeth Moore, BSPH ’15, Practice Manager]

It is so rewarding, this field. It is rewarding to help people, it is rewarding to solve the problems people are experiencing.

[voice changes; words appear: Thomasina Watts, BSPH ’16, Practice Manager]

Health is so integral to our success as people, and so important for us to have an active way to improve society overall. So how people’s actions can affect our health and our well-being.

[voice changes; words appear: John Coberg, Student]

As a Community Health major, you can impact the health of an entire population of people.

[words appear on screen: IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Fort Wayne]

[end of video]

 

When I found the community health major, I knew that this is how I can make an impact.

John Coberg, BSPH Community Health Alumnus

Curriculum

To complete this degree, you will take a minimum of 35 credit hours of general education courses, 69 credit hours of coursework in the major, and 16 credit hours of general electives that together total at least 120 credits. Major requirements can be mapped to fulfill requirements for pre-med and other pre-professional plans.

Community Health Curriculum

Competencies

The BSPH major in Community Health will prepare students to work in entry-level positions in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), hospitals and health care centers, and other organizations focused on the health and well-being of groups of individuals. It also provides excellent preparation for the Master's in Public Health degree program. Students will have opportunities to develop research skills, cultivate team work and leadership skills, and have international health experiences through additional coursework and practical opportunities. Specific program outcomes (numbered for reference, not to communicate importance) include:

  1. Recognize the social determinants of health that impact individuals and communities.
  2. Explain and apply the principles of epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, health care systems, and health policy in public and community health.
  3. Describe the historical role of public health nationally and globally, and identify and understand current and future public health challenges faced by the U.S. and the world.
  4. Select, collect, correctly interpret, and apply quality data for assessment and planning in individual and public health.
  5. Plan, administer, manage, and evaluate community health promotion interventions and programs.
  6. Implement community health promotion interventions and programs.
  7. Conduct evaluation and research related to community health promotion.
  8. Communicate effectively while serving as a resource person to individuals, communities and stakeholders.
  9. Based on evidence and data, advocate for practices, programming, and policies that address health issues.
  10. Demonstrate an understanding of cultural competency and ethical decision making.
  11. Communicate the role of fairness and justice in health equity.

Admission criteria

Ready to get started? You must first apply to IU Fort Wayne

If you are currently attending IU Fort Wayne and want to pursue one of our majors, please meet with Danielle Dickow (ddickow@iufw.edu) to declare or change your major. Minimum admission criteria to the school and program:

  • 12 credit hours completed
  • 2.5 prior term GPA
  • 2.5 cumulative IU GPA
  • Completion of English 13100 with a grade of "C" or higher

Apply to the Fairbanks School of Public Health

Please note you will be leaving the IU Fort Wayne website to complete the application on an IUPUI hosted site. You will be redirected back to our IUFW page upon submitting your application to the school.

Direct Admission Criteria

Once you’ve been admitted to IU Fort Wayne, you are eligible for direct admission to the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health if you meet the following minimums:

  • 2.8 high school GPA and 1,000 on the SAT (19 on the ACT)

or

  • 3.0 high school GPA without submission of SAT or ACT scores

If you are admitted to IU Fort Wayne but are not admissible directly to the school of public health, you can be admitted as a pre-public health student until the following minimum criteria are met:

  • 12 credit hours completed
  • 2.5 previous term GPA
  • 2.5 cumulative GPA
  • Completion of ENGL 13100 with a grade of “C” or higher

Students in the school of public health must maintain at least a 2.5 semester and cumulative GPA to remain in good academic standing and graduate from this program.

Questions? Contact our Admissions Counselor.

Intercampus Transfer

If you are transferring to IU Fort Wayne from another IU campus, you may pursue one of our majors if you meet the following minimum criteria:

  • 2.5 previous term GPA
  • 2.5 cumulative GPA

Students in the school of public health must maintain at least a 2.5 semester and cumulative GPA to remain in good academic standing and graduate from this program.

External Transfers

If you are transferring to IU Fort Wayne from another university, please e-mail Danielle Dickow ddickow@iufw.edu for more information.

Career options

The BSPH in Community Health will position you for many different career paths. Upon completion of the degree, you can pursue careers in health promotion or pursue additional training in medical schools, accelerated nursing programs, or other healthcare-oriented fields.

Employment opportunities for BSPH graduates with a major in Community Health are projected to grow 13% between now and 2024, faster than the average for all occupations according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prospective employers, including insurance companies, local and state health departments, healthcare systems, health-related agencies, colleges, and corporations, are working to find ways to improve the quality of care and health outcomes, while reducing costs. They hire health educators and community health workers to teach people how to make healthier choices, obtain life-saving health screenings, and how to prevent diseases, medical procedures and injury. They explain how lifestyle changes can reduce the risk of developing many preventable diseases, such as lung cancer, HIV, heart disease, and skin cancer. Health educators and community health workers also help people better manage chronic conditions.

Possible career opportunities for graduates of the BSPH in Community Health include:

  • Disease Prevention Specialist
  • Health Advocate
  • Health Coach
  • Health Educator
  • Program Coordinator
  • Worksite Wellness Educator
  • Community Outreach Coordinator